Hazard Mitigation Plan 2020 Update

The City of Sugar Land is currently updating the 2020 Hazard Mitigation Plan. The purpose of the Plan is to identify natural and man-made hazards, activities to reduce losses from those hazards, and establish a coordinated process to implement the Plan. The City needs your input to create a safer, more disaster-resilient community. The Survey is comprised of 30 questions and is divided into the following three sections:

This survey consists of three sets of questions:

  1. The first section identifies demographic information used to correlate responses to the questionnaire.
  2. The second section involves potential hazards near you and whether your knowledge of potential hazards influenced your decision to choose where you live.
  3. The last section is about your experience and knowledge of natural and non-natural hazards in general and steps your household has taken to prepare for hazardous events.

Hazard Mitigation Plan Public Survey

For more information, please visit the City of Sugar Land’s Hazard Mitigation Plan Update page.

About the District

General The District is a political subdivision of the State of Texas, created by order of the Fort Bend County Commissioners’ Court, adopted on July 9, 2002, and operates pursuant to Chapter 49 and 57 of the Texas Water Code.

The District is a conservation and reclamation district created pursuant to the provisions of Chapter 57, Texas Water Code and Article XVI, Section 59 of the Texas Constitution. The principal functions of the District include constructing and maintaining levees and other improvements on, along and contiguous to rivers, creeks and streams within and adjacent to the District; reclamation of lands within the District from overflow from these streams; the control and distribution of the waters of rivers and streams within and adjacent to the District by straightening and otherwise improving them; the provision of proper drainage and other improvements of the reclaimed land within the District and developing and maintaining recreational facilities.

The District contains approximately 2,331 acres of land and is located approximately 22 miles southwest of the central downtown business district of the City of Houston and lies wholly within the boundaries of the City of Sugar Land. The District also lies within the boundaries of the Fort Bend Independent School District. Access to the District is provided by U.S. Highway 59 (Interstate 69) to University Boulevard

Grass Clippings and Leaves

Debris can cause clogging of storm drains.

When storm drains (also known as catch basins) clog with leaves and/or other debris, water can no longer drain from the street. This water can then pool along streets and flood intersections and homes.

Contrary to popular belief, pet wastes, oil and other materials dumped into catch basins do not go to the wastewater treatment plant, but instead flow directly into streams and rivers. Dumping grass clippings, debris and other material into the storm drain is not only illegal, but contributes pollution to our waterways and causes localized flooding.

It is important to keep catch basins free of obstructions to prevent street flooding, property damage, and hazards to the traveling public.

How should I dispose of leaves and debris?

When you are clearing your sidewalk or driveway, please do not rake or blow the leaves from your yard into the street. One option would be to sweep, collect, and bag grass clippings and leaves. Another option is to blow grass clippings back onto the lawn where they can become a mulch and a natural fertilizer. Further, consider raking or blowing leaves/debris into a compost pile, where they can decompose.